WWI - Kingston-Frontenac Units

Capture

Learn more about the unit with which the soldier or nursing sister served. This is usually stamped or written on the Attestation Papers, or in the person's profile on the website of the Canadian Great War Project. Find out more about these resources on the Online Databases page of our Home Town Home Front project.


Artillery

Royal Canadian Horse Artillery Brigade (RCHA)

3rd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in August 1914 under the command of Major Russell H. Britton.
    • Mobilized at Gananoque and Kingston.
    • Recruited in Leeds and Frontenac countries from 5th Field Battery (Kingston) and 8th Field Battery (Gananoque), Non-Permanent Active Militia.
    • Left Quebec 29 September 1914 aboard SAXONIA.
    • Arrived in England 19 October 1914.
    • Strength: 6 officers, 218 other ranks.
    • Arrived in France 11 February 1915.
    • 1st Brigade, 1st Canadian Divisional Artillery.
    • Demobilized at Kingston 30 April 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.
    • Perpetuated by 3rd (Gananoque) Field Battery.

 

22nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in November 1914 under the command of Major W. R Riordan.
    • Authorization published in General Order 36 of 15 March 1915.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Kingston.
    • Left Halifax 23 February 1915 aboard MEGANTIC
    • Arrived in England 6 March 1915.
    • Strength: 4 officers, 151 other ranks,
    • With 21st, 23rd and 24th Batteries, formed Reserve Brigade Canadian Field Artillery for 1st Canadian Divisional Artillery in April 1915.
    • Colours deposited in Westminster Abbey for duration of war. Returned to Kingston in 1919 by 21st Battalion.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

32nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in August 1915 under the command of Major S.A. McKenzie.
    • Authorization published in General Order 103a of 15 August 1915.
    • Mobilized at Barriefield.
    • Recruited in Kingston and Ottawa.
    • Left Saint John 5 February 1916 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Arrived in England 14 February 1916
    • Arrived in France 14 July 1916.
    • 9th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery: transferred to 8th army Brigade Canadian Field Artillery in July 1917.
    • Demobilized at Montreal in 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.
    • Perpetuated by 32nd (Kingston) Field Battery.

 

33rd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in August 1915 under the command of Major Winthrop W. Sears.
    • Authorization published in General Order 103a of 15 August 1915.
    • Mobilized at Barriefield.
    • Recruited in Kingston and Toronto.
    • Left Saint John 5 February 1916.
    • Arrived in France 14 July 1916.
    • 9th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery.
    • Demobilized at Toronto, 28 March 1
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

45th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in January 1916 under the command of Major Allan G. Gill.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited entirely from "C" Battery, RCHA.
    • Left Saint John 5 February 1916 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Arrived in England 14 February 1916.
    • Arrived in France 14 July 1916.
    • 9th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery.
    • Demobilized at Kingston in March 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

46th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in November 1915 under the command of Major L.W. Gill.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited among students of Queen's University, with some from University of British Columbia.
    • Left Saint John 5 February 1916 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Arrived in England 14 February 1916.
    • Arrived in France 15 July 1916.
    • 11th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery.
    • Ceased to exist 24 March 1917; personnel absorbed by battteries of 9th Brigade.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

52nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in February 1916 under the command of Major N.H. Macauley.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Coburg, Peterborough and Kingston.
    • Left Halifax 19 September 1916 aboard OLYMPIC.
    • Arrived in England 25 September 1916.
    • Arrived in France 21 August 1917.
    • 13th Brigade, 2nd Canadian Divisional Artillery (5th Canadian Divisional Artillery in England).
    • Demobilized at Toronto in June 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.
    • Perpetuated by 52nd Field Battery, Weymouth, Nova Scotia

 

72nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in May 1916 as a draft-giving depot battery under the command of Captain R. R. Carr-Harris.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited from students and graduates personnel of Queen's University. Nucleus formed from personnel of 50th Battery who did not accompany it overseas.
    • Absorbed by No.3 Artillery Depot (Military District 3) in October 1918.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

73rd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in May 1916 as a draft-giving depot battery under the command of Major E. C. Barrett.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Recruited in Military District 3, particularly in the Kingston-Gananoque area.
    • Absorbed by No.3 Artillery Depot (Military District 3) in October 1918.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 

75th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

  • Overview
    • Organized in May 1916 as a draft-giving depot battery under the command of Captain A. Latornell.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Military District 3, particularly in Cornwall and Brockville.
    • Absorbed by No.3 Artillery Depot (Military District 3) in October 1918.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

Infantry Battalions

 

21st Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in October 1914 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. St. P. Hughes. Later OCs E. W. Jones, DSO (13 July 1916), F.L. Elmitt (9 May 1917).
    • Authorization published in General Order 36 of 15 March 1915.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Eastern Ontario.
    • Embarked from Montreal 6 May 1915 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Disembarked England 15 May 1915.
    • Strength: 42 officers, 1053 other ranks.
    • Arrived in France 14 September 1915.
    • 2nd Canadian Division, 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade.
    • Reinforced by 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion.
    • Returned to England 7 April 1919.
    • Disembarked in Canada 22 May 1919.
    • Demobilized 23 May 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.
    • Pipe band and bugle band.
    • Mascot: "Nan", a white goat.
  •  Links

 

39th Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in December 1914 under the Command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. V. Preston.
    • Authorization published in General Order 86 of 1 July 1915.
    • Mobilized at Belleville.
    • Recruited in Lindsay, Peterborough, Belleville, Port Hope, Trenton, Picton, Napanee, Kingston and Cobourg.
    • Embarked from Montreal 24 June 1915 aboard MISSANABIE.
    • Disembarked England 3 July 1915. Became a reserve battalion.
    • Strength: 40 officers, 1003 other ranks.
    • Between October and December 1915 sent 496 to 11 battalions in France.
    • Between January and March 1916 sent 855 to 23 battalions in France.
    • In April and May 1916 sent 144 to 14 battalions.
    • Personnel of 37th, 59th and 70th Battalions taken on strength 6 July 1916.
    • Between June and Aug. 1916 sent 754 to several battalions.
    • Sent 121 to 4 units in Sept. 1916.
    • Personnel of 93rd and 136th Battalions taken on strength 6 October 1916.
    • Between October and December 1916 sent 475 to 13 battalions.
    • Personnel transferred to 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion 4 January 1917.
    • Disbandment approved by Privy Council Order 1895 of 17 July 1917.
    • Colours, donated by Women's Canadian Club of Belleville, was made in England and presented by Sir Sam Hughes in June 1915. Deposited in Lydol Parish Church, Kent. Returned to Canada by Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. V. Preston and given to donors on 5 March 1917.
    • Perpetuated by The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment and by The Northumberland Regiment which, in 1936, amalgamated with The Durham Regiment to form the Midland Regiment.
  • Book
    • Nicholson, G. W. L. 1962. Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919. Queens Printer and Controller of Stationary, Ottawa, Canada.
  • Links

 59th Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in July 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. J. Dawson.
    • Authorization published in General Order 103a of 15 August 1915.
    • Mobilized at Barriefield.
    • Recruited in Ottawa, Kingston, Bellevillle, Picton, Cobourg, Brockville, Perth, Lindsay, Port Hope, Prescott, Peterborough and Alexandria.
    • Drafts of 250 each sent to 39th Battalion in September and November 1915.
    • Embarked from Halifax 5 April 1916 aboard OLYMPIC.
    • Disembarked England 11 April 1916.
    • Strength: 36 officers, 1073 other ranks.
    • Absorbed by 39th Battalion on 6 July 1916 which, on 4 January 1917 was absorbed by 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion.
    • 59th Battalion disbanded 4 June 1917 (GO 63/1917).
    • Colours presented by Mrs. Richard Waldron of Kingston on 5 October 1915 at Barriefield.
    • Deposited in St. George's Cathedral, Kingston.
    • Had a goat for a mascot (RG 9, III, vol. 735, file M-56-2).
    • Perpetuated by The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment.

 

80th Battalion

146th Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in November 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Charles A. Low.
    • Authorization published in General Order 151 of 22 December 1915.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Frontenac, Lennox and Addington counties.
    • Embarked from Halifax 27 September 1916 aboard SOUTHLAND.
    • Disembarked England 6 October 1916.
    • Strength: 26 officers, 581 other ranks.
    • Absorbed by 95th Battalion on 6 October 1916.
    • Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.
    • Brass and bugle bands. Instruments donated by A. Davis and son, Kingston.
    • Band drawn from Salvation Army, Kingston.
    • Colours presented by Mrs. J.B. Pense on behalf of the citizens of Kingston after departure of battalion: deposited immediately in St. Andrew's Church, Kingston.
    • Perpetuated by The Frontenac Regiment.
  • Links

   

253rd Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in October 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel P.G.C. Campbell.
    • Authorization published in General Order 11 of 1 February 1917.
    • Mobilized at Kingston.
    • Recruited in Kingston, Cornwall and Cobalt.
    • Embarked from Halifax 29 April 1917 aboard OLYMPIC.
    • Disembarked England 7 May 1917.
    • Strength: 17 officers, 461 other ranks.
    • Absorbed by 5th Canadian Reserve Battalion.
    • Disbanded by Privy Council Order 3355 of 8 December 1917 Pipe band.
    • Perpetuated by The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment.
    • Officers wore Argyll and Sutherland tartan.

 

259th Battalion

  • Overview
    • Organized in September 1918 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.E. Swift.
    • Authorization published in CEF Routine Order 1087 of September 1918 and in General Order 128 of 1 November 1918.
    • Mobilized at Victoria.
    • Recruited in London, Toronto, Kingston, Montreal and Quebec City. Included conscripts.
    • Embarked from Victoria 26 December 1918 aboard PROTESILAUS and TEESTA
    • Disembarked Vladivostok 15 and 12 January 1919.
    • Strength: 33 officers, 1038 other ranks.
    • Returned to Canada in May 1919.

Canadian Army Medical Corps

 

No. 15 Canadian Field Ambulance

  • Overview
    • Organized in Kingston in May 1916 under the command of Major R.M. Filson.
    • Authorization published in General Order 63 of 15 June 1917.
    • The unit was "under the patronage of" Queens University and all officers were graduates of the university.
    • Left Halifax 28 March 1917 aboard SAXONIA.
    • Arrived in England 7 April 1917.
    • Strength: 10 officers, 182 other ranks.
    • 5th Canadian Division.
    • Unit ceased to exist 2 April 1918: personnel absorbed into Canadian Army Medical Corps.
    • Depot at Shorncliffe.
    • Disbanded by General Order 211 of 15 November 1920.

 

No. 5 Canadian Stationary Hospital (Queen's)

  • Overview
    • Organized at Kingston in March 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel F. Etherington.
    • Authorization published in General Order 86 of 1 July 1915.
    • Left Montreal 6 May 1915 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Arrived in England 15 May 1915.
    • Strength: 19 officers, 47 nursing sisters, 86 other ranks.
    • Tent hospital, St. Martin's Plain, Shorncliffe, June - Aygyst 1915.
    • Arrived at Alexandria 12 August 1915. At Cairo, August 1915 - April 1916.
    • Redesignated as No. 7 Canadian General Hospital on 26 January 1916.
    • Disbanded by General Order 211 of 15 November 1920.
    • See also No. 7 Canadian General Hospital.

 

No. 7 Canadian General Hospital (Queen's University)

  • Overview
    • Organized at Kingston in March 1915 as No. 5 Canadian Stationary Hospital.
    • Commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel F. Etherington.
    • Authorization published in General Order 86 of 1 July 1915.
    • Left Montreal 6 May 1915 aboard METAGAMA.
    • Arrived in England 15 May 1915.
    • Strength: 19 officers, 47 nursing sisters, 86 other ranks.
    • St. Martin's Plain, Shorncliffe, June - August 1915.
    • Arrived at Alexandria 12 August 1915.
    • Cairo, August 1915 - April 1916.
    • Redesignated as No. 7 Canadian General Hospital on 26 January 1916.
    • Arrived in France 21 April 1916.
    • Le Treport, April - October 1916; Etaples, October 1916 - May 1919.
    • Closed 31 May 1919.
    • Disbanded by General Order 211 of 15 November 1920.
    • See also No. 5 Canadian Stationary Hospital.

 


Other

 

2nd Divisional Cyclist Company

  • Overview
    • Organized at Toronto and Halifax in October 1914 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel G. Y. Denison.
    • Authorization published in General Order 63 of 15 June 1915.
    • Platoons from Toronto, Montreal, Kingston, Vancouver, Winnipeg and Halifax.
    • Advertised for recruits "possessing more than average inte of education".
    • First draft left Montreal 16 May 1915 aboard CORINTHIAN
    • Arrived in England 27 May 1915.
    • Second draft left Halifax 15 June 1915 aboard CALEDONIAN
    • Arrived in England 22 June 1915.
    • Strength: 9 officers, 176 other ranks.
    • Arrived in France 15 September 1915.
    • 2nd Canadian Division.
    • Absorbed by Canadian Corps Cyclist Battalion in May 1916.
    • Disbanded by General Order 208 of 15 November 1920.

 

3rd Canadian Divisional Ammunition Column

  • Overview
    • Organized in December 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.G. Hurdman.
    • Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916.
    • No.1 Section recruited in Kingston, No. 2 Section Winnipeg, and No. 3 Section in Winnipeg. (A fourth section was added in England but the unit was reduced to three sections in June 1917).
    • Left Saint John 17 March 1916 aboard MIETAGMA
    • Arrived in England 25 March 1916.
    • Arrived in France 15 July 1916. 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery.
    • Returned to England 19 February 1919.
    • Arrived in Canada March 1919.
    • Demobilized at Ottawa and Toronto.
    • Disbanded by General Order 191 of 1 November 1920.

 


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  Text Source: Overviews are excerpts from "Sources Relating to Units of the Canadian Expeditionary Force" [online] Library and Archives Canada ( http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/Pages/units-canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx : accessed 27 August 2014), series of 31 documents in pdf format, searched for the words "kingston" and then "frontenac" using Ctl+F; including only those recruited in Kingston or Frontenac County, not those recruited elsewhere and mobilised in Kingston OR those that were disbanded in Kingston. Image Source: "Buy War Bonds. Pave the way to victory" / Digital ID: (color film copy transparency) cph 3g12168 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g12168 / Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA